America’s Fentanyl Crisis: Synthetic Opioids

Americas-Fentanyl-Crisis

Americas-Fentanyl-Crisis

 

Before we get more into America’s fentanyl crisis and how dangerous fentanyl addiction is, it helps to know what the drug is and how it works. Fentanyl is a big factor contributing to the opioid crisis and opioid overdoses. Opioids (heroin, morphine, methadone, and codeine) are typically used for treating pain symptoms and are usually prescribed by doctors and then people become addicted quickly.

 

What is Fentanyl?  

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid, made in a lab, used to treat patients with extreme pain (especially after surgery, like morphine.) However, Fentanyl is 50x stronger than heroin and 100x stronger than morphine. This makes the chance even more significant for an overdose; a minor change in dosage can cost you your life. 

Tolerance happens when you require a larger and/or more regular dose of a drug to get the desired results. It is sometimes used to treat people with chronic pain who are physically tolerant to other medications, and nothing seems to work on them anymore.

 

How do People Use Fentanyl?

When prescribed by a doctor for extreme pain, fentanyl is usually administered in a patch, shot, pill, liquid, or tablet. However fentanyl is sometimes distributed on the streets as a powder, and this illegal fentanyl can become combined with other products, sometimes on purpose or accidentally through cross-contamination. It sometimes even gets put in eye droppers, nasal sprays, or made into pills that look like other prescription opioids.

When used as prescribed, this medication serves as an effective pain killer. Illegally used fentanyl is closely associated with America’s recent spike in overdoses. 

Fentanyl is often mixed with other narcotics, such as heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, and MDMA. This is because generating a high with fentanyl requires a very small dosage, making it a cheap additive. This is particularly dangerous if drug users do not know that they are consuming the opioid. They may take a dose that is stronger than their bodies can handle and may are likely to overdose.

 

What Are The Side Effects of Fentanyl?

Fentanyl side effects can be life-threatening and include:

  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Drowsiness
  • Weight Loss
  • Heartburn
  • Difficulty Urinating
  • Difficulty Breathing
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Fainting
  • Difficulty Sleeping
  • High Blood Pressure

 

Fentanyl Overdose

An Individual can more easily overdose on fentanyl than on any other drug. When people have an overdose of fentanyl, their breathing can slow or stop altogether. Hypoxia causes the amount of oxygen that enters the brain to be decreased and can lead to a coma, irreversible brain damage, and even death.

America’s Fentanyl Crisis

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), “From 2017 to 2018, overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids other than methadone, which includes fentanyl, rose 10 percent. More than 31,000 individuals died in 2018 from overdoses involving synthetic opioids.”

 

America’s Fentanyl Crisis

Fentanyl confiscations rose by almost 7x from 2012 to 2014, according to data from the National Forensic Laboratory Information System. In 2014, there were 4,585 confiscations, this means that the sharp rise in opioid-related deaths could be due to the increased availability of illegally manufactured, non-pharmaceutical, and non-prescribed fentanyl.

The number of states that record 20 or more confiscations of fentanyl per six months is growing. 

The most popular drugs implicated in drug overdose overdoses in the United States are now opioids, including fentanyl. In 2020 fentanyl was involved in 80% of opioid-related deaths, compared to 14.3 percent in 2010!

Keep fentanyl out of reach of children; If used unintentionally by a child who has not been prescribed the drug, fentanyl can be life-threatening. Fentanyl, even partially used, can contain a sufficient dose enough to cause severe injury or death. 

If you are prescribed Fentanyl, be sure to keep it in a bottle with child safety locks to prevent accidental overdose. Dispose of partly used medication according to the manufacturer’s medication guide immediately after use. If you witness someone who is overdosing on fentanyl or any other opioid call 911 immediately so they can administer an antidote that, if administered quickly enough, can rapidly reverse the effects of opioid overdose.

 

Not a New Drug

Fentanyl is not a new drug. It has been around and used in medical settings since the 60s, but it only is getting national attention in the past few years. High publicity deaths, like Prince and George Floyd, pointed the spotlight on fentanyl and its dangerous properties. 

Even though America’s fentanyl crisis has only become popular in recent years, opioid use disorder has been plaguing people for a much longer time. If you or someone you know is struggling with opioid use disorder contact us for help. Anchored Tides is a female-only treatment environment that encourages growth far beyond drug addiction treatment. 

5 Questions To Ask When Dealing with Trauma & Rehab

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trauma-and-addiction

 

Not everybody who struggles with substance use disorders reports being exposed to an emotionally traumatizing experience before their drug use, but most of them do. According to a study by the National Institute of Health (NIH), “more than 70% of adolescents being treated for substance use disorders had a history of trauma exposure.” That is a very significant percentage of people and the number – although not commonly known – is not surprising. Trauma and rehab go hand in hand and are closely related. 

Many people who experience traumas, especially at an early age, turn to drug use at a later age as a form of self-medicating. 

Trauma treatment and addiction treatment could be addressed together through therapy sessions at an addiction center. These facilities may offer residential treatment, intensive outpatient programs, group therapy, and one on one counseling to address substance abuse-related issues stemming from traumatic events. 

Even facilities that focus on creating the right therapeutic environment to make discussing traumatic events more comfortable exist. Anchored Tides Recovery is a gender-specific rehab for women, offering outpatient treatments explicitly focused on coping with the traumatic experiences women face and promoting long-term recovery through the involvement of a community of people who understands how it feels. 

 

Are you Looking for a Drug Rehab Program? 

We understand that drug and alcohol addiction is a disorder that is related to mental health. Suppose you are someone dealing with trauma, trying to quit addiction and live a sober life. In that case, there are thousands of drug rehab programs across the United States dedicated to helping on the road to recovery. Rehab centers have various medications and therapies to support your process to make it safe and effective. 

Seeking help for addiction and therapy for your trauma will improve your overall health and reduce your risk of relapse and related complications. The variety of drug addiction treatment programs available is vast; choosing the right rehab center can feel overwhelming at first. Luckily, there are resources available to help you determine the best fit, and once you are enrolled, you will be much better off.  With so many options available for trauma and rehab, how do you select the rehab center that best suits you? 

 

Let Us Help You in Choosing the Right Rehab Center 

Here’s all the information you need to be prepared for moving forward and five key questions to ask a potential drug rehab center:

 

What services do you offer?

Treatment options and services vary considerably between facilities. Depending on your drug of choice and your drug use’s severity, you may require different services. Medically assisted detox for withdrawal symptoms, inpatient rehab programs, intensive outpatient, group therapy, family members therapy, couples counseling, co-occurring treatment, spirituality based services, etc. There is no “one size fits all” approach to addiction treatment. 

 

Is your rehab licensed and accredited?

A rehab center that has completed an accreditation process displays its commitment to excellence and the accrediting organization’s high standards. All drug rehab centers should meet the state’s licensure requirements and receive certification through several agencies. 

 

What is the staff to client ratio? 

You want to be sure your loved ones are getting the attention that they deserve. Ask each prospective treatment facility how many staff will be a part of the treatment and how many patients they have. This factor is vital to consider because the support staff works very closely with patients, ensuring an ever-present and positive model in each resident’s life.

 

How much do your programs cost, and what are my payment options?

Not everyone can afford a “luxury” drug rehabilitation program that costs tens of thousands of dollars. But this shouldn’t mean that they should be denied a chance to sobriety. When considering a drug rehab center for treatment, it’s always best to ask about cost directly and get details about payment options. Many drug rehab programs accept insurance coverage and are very affordable.

 

What sort of traumas do you specialize in treating?

Every individual situation is unique, especially with trauma. There are many different types of traumatic events that are best addressed by different types of professionals that work for trauma and rehab — sexual trauma, child trauma, violent trauma, abusive trauma, etc. You may be doing yourself a favor to determine which professionals you’d want to work with if you have a case that is not easily generalized. 

 

Make a well-informed decision and get hold of your life

We understand that choosing the rehab near me can be overwhelming for you, given that you don’t have any prior experience. Many different factors may influence your final decision to enroll at a rehab center. Still, these five questions can help you make a well-informed decision to achieve long-lasting sobriety. 

trauma-and-rehab

We believe that unaddressed trauma, mental health, and other issues that lead to relapse must be addressed to help women get into longer-lasting recovery. Call our trained staff to discuss this process in more detail and learn about the rehab programs we offer. 

Opioid Overdose: Causes, Signs, and Precautions

opioid-overdose

opioid-overdose

 

Opioid Overdose

About .5 million deaths are attributable to drug use worldwide; more than 70% of these deaths are related to opioids, with more than 30% of those deaths caused by overdose. According to The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, approximately 115 000 people died of opioid overdose in 2017. What are opioids, and why is opioid misuse so common when there are so much evidence points to a drug overdose? Here is everything you need to know about the epidemic of life-threatening opioid overdose, its causes, signs, and precautions. 

 

What are Opioids?

Opiates, or opioids, are narcotic painkillers that bind to neural opioid receptors in the brain. Once attached to your opioid receptors, the substance depresses your central nervous system, creating a “downer” effect, and suppresses pain while simultaneously producing a euphoric effect. In a medical setting, opiates are prescribed for pain management, which is how many people get hooked. Opiates are highly addictive and currently are the most abused substances in America. 

Opioid use and misuse can result in addiction, overdose, withdrawal, and death.

 

Can a Narcotic Painkiller Become My Drug of Choice?

The United States is currently facing an opioid epidemic; according to the latest statistics from National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), approximately 11.4 million people in the United States and around 36 million people worldwide abuse opioids every year. 

Narcotic pain relievers include:

  • Codeine
  • Heroin
  • Hydrocodone (Vicodin)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
  • Methadone
  • Meperidine (Demerol)
  • Morphine
  • Oxycodone (Percocet or Oxycontin)
  • Fentanyl (Synthetic Opioid)
  • Tramadol

The regular use of opioids, prolonged use, abuse, and use without medical supervision can lead to opioid dependence and other health problems, such as overdose. 

 

Signs of Opioid Overdose

You can identify an opioid overdose by a combination of three signs and symptoms:

  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Unconsciousness 
  • Breathing difficulties

Prescription opioid use can even lead to opioid overdose death due to the pharmacological effects on the part of the brain that regulates breathing.

 

Prevention of Opioid Overdose

There are specific measures that can be taken to prevent an opioid overdose at an early stage:

  • Increase the availability of opioid dependence treatment
  • Reduce irrational or inappropriate opioid prescriptions
  • Carefully monitor opioid prescribing and dispensing
  • Limit inappropriate under-the-table sales of opioids
  • Find alternative pain management methods

Opiate prescriptions have been increasing since 2010, despite the data showing opiate overdose death rates increasing as well. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), In 2017, there were almost 58 opioid prescriptions written per every 100 Americans.

There is a massive gap between recommendations and practices. Only half of the countries provide access to effective treatment options for opioid dependence. Less than 10% of people worldwide, who are genuinely in need of such treatment, are receiving it.

 

What to Do if you Witness an Opioid Overdose?

If you witness someone, or you yourself feel you are, on the verge of collapsing due to an opioid overdose, calling 911 for an emergency response protocol may save a life. Opioid overdose death can be prevented if the person receives a timely administration of the drug Naloxone, an antidote that rapidly reverses the effects of an opioid overdose if administered to the patient in time

There is limited availability of naloxone in many countries, and access to naloxone is generally limited to health professionals and not available over the counter. On the contrary, some countries have already made naloxone available in pharmacies without a prescription. 

People with substance abuse are generally aware of the risks and dangers that come along with opiate addiction. If one were to decide they wanted to overcome their addiction to opiates before things got worse they may likely be facing Opiate withdrawal and a detoxification process. 

 

Opioid Withdrawal 

When you’ve become addicted to opiates you will become emotionally and physically dependent on the presence of the substance. With time, your body becomes desensitized to the drug, and you’ll need more of it to feel its effects. After heavy use, once you stop taking these drugs you will likely experience several symptoms of withdrawal. 

Opioid withdrawal can be categorized as mild, moderate, moderately severe, and severe. Your healthcare provider can determine this by evaluating your opioid use history and symptoms.

Opiate withdrawal occurs in two phases. The first phase includes several symptoms, such as:

  • muscle aches
  • restlessness
  • anxiety and depression
  • teary eyes/ runny nose
  • excessive sweating
  • Insomnia
  • agitation

 

The second phase is marked by:

  • diarrhea
  • abdominal cramps
  • nausea and vomiting
  • increased heart rate and blood pressure

opioid-overdose

These initial phases can last anywhere from a week to a month and can be followed by long-term withdrawal symptoms that may involve emotional or behavioral issues.

 

Medical detox from Opiates

It takes time to recover from opiate addiction. Recovery is a journey, not a destination. Opiate detox from home is strongly not recommended, it is dangerous and statistically ineffective. 

Recovery centers are best suited for medical detoxification from opiates; will improve your overall health and reduce your risk of complications related to opioid dependence and help prevent relapse. In some cases, withdrawal from opiates could be deadly. A recovery center with medically assisted detoxification services will have a team that can monitor your vitals, keep you safe, and use medications to mitigate the symptoms of withdrawal (making the process as comfortable as possible.)

Talk to your doctor or healthcare provider about addiction treatment programs. Once you successfully get through detox, you will feel an overall improvement in your physical and mental health.

 

Aftercare

Detox is generally the first step in the recovery process, but detox alone is not a treatment. After detox, your counselor will curate a plan for you to follow that will have you stepping down levels of care. You may be recommended to complete residential inpatient care, followed by outpatient therapy services, followed by sober maintenance through treatment options such as support groups. The process may seem long, but it has been proven to help save countless lives and provide hope for those who feel lost. 

If you want to learn more, visit our website or call us at 1-866-753-5865 and talk to our health professionals to enroll in an effective women-only treatment center and live a drug-free life. 

7 Ways Mindfulness Helps in Maintaining Long-Term Sobriety

7-ways-being-mindful-for-long-term-sobriety
7-ways-being-mindful-for-long-term-sobriety

The practice of being mindful can be a valuable ally in maintaining long-term sobriety. Letting go of any preconceived notions you have towards “new-age” practice is a process that may initially face some resistance. Still, once embraced, it’s proven helpful for many people towards maintaining Long-Term Sobriety and finding peace.

Embracing some new-age concepts doesn’t mean you need to become a vegan and start collecting crystals. There are many aspects of mindfulness that you can simply learn or understand and use to aid daily life. People in recovery who focus on their environment, movement, breathing, and own shortcomings can find practical and long-lasting ways to navigate through a life of sobriety.

This piece will outline seven mindful mechanisms to prioritize your mental health and bring you closer to a more relaxed, present, and happy self – without alcohol or drugs. 

 

So… What is being mindful?

As the name implies, mindfulness is the practice of tuning into oneself and becoming aware. The approach of “being present” means ignoring concerns of the past and worries about the future, not allowing yourself to be distracted from awareness of everything taking place in the present moment. One way to effectively achieve this state of awareness is through meditation or focused breathing. 

Practicing mindfulness often involves meditation, but perhaps not in the way you’re thinking. 

 

How to Meditate

The basic idea of meditation is just to sit down and breathe. Simple enough, right? Just breathe. “Watch your breath,” you might be told on a mindful meditation recording or by an instructor. How do you watch something you can’t even see? This phrase simply means to bring the focus back to your breathing. 

Mindful meditation was once explained to me as “watching clouds go by in the sky.” 

…What does that even mean? 

“Your mind is the sky, and the clouds are any thoughts or emotions that arise as you breathe and ‘watch the sky.” 

7-ways-being-mindful-for-long-term-sobriety

Inevitably, some thoughts will pop into your head, primarily because our minds and bodies are used to constant stimulation. When this happens, the idea is to acknowledge these thoughts as distractions and not waste any energy to “chase” them, but instead allow them to pass, just as clouds pass by, and return our attention to breathing.

The best part of this is you don’t have to do it for too long. One minute per day is a simple place to start – we all have 1 minute to spare. As you get more comfortable, do more sessions of one minute per day. Eventually, increase the length of those and start 5-minute sessions. Find what works for you and your schedule; being mindful is not so much about quantity as it is the quality of the practice. 

It takes time and practice to get to a place where you will feel comfortable in training. Don’t feel bad if you don’t get it on your first try. A significant driving factor of being mindful is that there is no real end to the practice. Kind of like sober life, even after you complete addiction treatment and no longer drink or use drugs, you’re never really done avoiding relapse. 

 

So How Can This Practice Help Someone Maintain Long-Term Sobriety? Let’s Dive in!

 

Calm Down the Mental Chatter

Once you establish a mindful mentality, you’ll begin to focus less on some of the “talk” that’s always going on in our minds. Our brains are designed to problem solve and to be constantly on the alert. Worries, concerns, plans we think we need to make, things we need to remember, etc. This type of constant thinking is a source of stress and anxiety, which is a driving factor for substance abuse. Through mindfulness, we can begin to tune out the stress and stay focused, calm, and make the right decisions.

 

Identify your “Inner Voice”

When you first become sober, it takes time to learn to relax without drugs or alcohol. One technique that helps start a mindful practice is to “label” or “name” the thoughts or emotions that take us away from our sobriety and peace. 

Assign labels to your thoughts as they happen, like; 

  • “Worrying”
  • “Craving” 
  • “Romanticizing the drugs”
  • “Ignoring the consequences”

As you practice, you’ll notice that the more you label your thoughts, the less you’ll actually engage in them. It takes some time, but soon enough, you’ll learn to recognize what your brain is doing, and you will find it easier to return to the present moment. 

 

Decrease Stress

This might be the most common benefit associated with mindfulness, and it can be felt immediately when beginning to practice. Basically, this ties into the first two we mentioned. The more we calm down our mental chatter and identify what type of thoughts are in our head (worry, planning, thinking, etc.), the more we will feel at ease. Calm your mind down and simply observe thoughts instead of engaging with them. This helps maintain Long-Term Sobriety since you’ll learn to identify when cravings creep up, then refocus your thoughts as the cravings pass (like clouds.) 

7-ways-being-mindful-for-long-term-sobriety

 

Creating a “Healthy Lifestyle” Habits 

Our brain relies on patterns. For people with substance use disorders, there are specific patterns that ended in drug use. By being mindful, you will create new, healthier habits and relearn new thinking patterns that will guide you from the previous thoughts and patterns that led to substance abuse

Support groups teach you that it takes 27 days to break a habit, and a critical method to maintaining sobriety is to replace your old habits with new ones. While you’re in the process of rebuilding your life, why not pick up some habits that will benefit you in the long run? Exercise, create art, master a skill, engage your brain in new ways to maintain Long-Term Sobriety and leave the old habits behind. 

 

Check-in with Yourself Daily. Stay focused.

A mindful practice is best done regularly. Set small but achievable goals concerning conscious behaviors and practice them regularly. I find that even ONE minute of mindful meditation can have a very positive effect. This effect is multiplied if that one minute is done a few times a day. Your brain chemistry reacts by releasing endorphins when you set a goal and complete it. 

All the accumulated new time you have on your hands that was previously spent doing drugs or being high can now be repurposed as a time to check in on your mental state, find some inner peace, stop disruptive mental chatter, and set yourself up for a better day.

 

Refresh your Environment, Refresh Your State of Mind

As fragile and new age as it may sound, meditation creates a new state of mind for us to default to. After becoming sober and through all the previous points outlined above, you will find yourself quite literally living a brand new life. In this new headspace, the previous habits you had will no longer fit. All that will remain are the new, more positive, and supportive habits you will create. A change of scenery can support this new mentality and can be applied in big and small ways, from spending some more time outdoors to moving away to an entirely new city. A new environment, along with a new mindset, can feel like a breath of fresh air after you’ve been suffocating. 

 

Saying Goodbye and Making Peace with the Old You

Techniques, like the ones we went over in this article, in combination with counseling, detox, and support groups (like 12 steps), will help you build a new identity that is more in line with your mission to maintain Long-Term Sobriety. Through the practice of tuning in and being mindful, a significant change happens;  your new habits, mentality, and thoughts will have you feeling like a brand new person. 

7-ways-being-mindful-for-long-term-sobriety

When you’re able to just be present at the moment, you’ll even learn to recognize the thoughts of your “old self.” By labeling thoughts and emotions, you will be able to identify when you’re in your former self’s mindset, which would lead to drug abuse, and stop the thinking in its tracks. Then, all you have to do is take a deep breath, label the thought, say “No thanks,” and move on. The views of your “old self” will pass by, just like clouds.

Letting go of who you think you are and embracing your new lifestyle is exciting, but it’s a long process that takes a lot of support and discipline. Through treatment programs, like Anchored Tides Recovery Center, you will develop skills and a support system of like-minded people to encourage you through the process. 

We’re in this together. If you have any mindfulness techniques that help move you towards a better life, leave a comment below. If you’re ready to take steps towards a healthy new life, call us to talk to one of our care coordinators. 

Say hello to healing and a new you. 

 

 

Preparing Your Children for When You Go to Drug Addiction Rehab

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drug-addiction

Drug Addiction

Substance use disorder is a chronic disease that drives people to continuously use drugs despite being aware of the harm it is doing to their bodies and their lives. Millions of Americans battle drug addiction, and helping someone get rid of addiction has been an issue that drug addiction treatment centers and mental health professionals have been trying to solve for decades.   

Understanding Addiction

There is a misconception that people struggling with drug addiction do so because it’s a choice. No one plans to become an addict. External factors that drive drug abuse and lead to addictive behaviors include stress from work, family issues, financial pressure, feeling disengaged from life, and sometimes just curiosity about a particular substance. Anyone who uses drugs can develop addictive behaviors, no matter their age, culture, or economic status. When a person consumes drugs or alcohol, their brain produces large amounts of dopamine (a feel-good hormone), which triggers the brain’s reward system. After continuous drug use, the brain can no longer produce the usual dopamine amount on its own. This causes people to have difficulties enjoying pleasurable activities like spending time with friends or family when they are not under the influence of drugs or alcohol – stuck with their drug addiction.  

Is Addiction A Family Disease?

While some experts report that there can be a genetic predisposition to substance abuse, many factors contribute to someone’s addiction. Whether or not the cause lies in genetics, addiction is a family disease because it affects everyone in the family. This is especially true when there are children involved. Preparing-Your-Children-When-You-Go-to-Rehab Family members of people struggling with addiction endure a lot of emotional and sometimes financial hardship while dealing with a relative who is trapped in the cycle of addiction. Loved ones often report feeling guilty, responsible for the substance use, confused, angry, and sad. This can increase conflict and feelings of isolation for everyone involved.  Drug addiction is a severe problem, but there is a solution. In this case, treatment programs at a rehab center sets the foundation for a life of sobriety.  

What is Rehab?

Rehab is the process during which someone is treated for their addiction. This most often happens at an inpatient facility to minimize outside distractions and temptations. Rehab can last from 30 to 90 days, but the length of time is dependent on the individual and their needs. Since addiction is a health-related issue, most rehab programs accept insurance coverage. For people who have children and are considering treatment at an inpatient facility, making the decision is even more challenging. Additional arrangements need to be made to ensure the child is taken care of before the parent can start their treatment.  

Living Arrangements for Drug Addiction

First, you will need to determine where your child will stay while you are in treatment. If there is another parent or family member who can care for your child in their current living arrangement, make a detailed plan of how childcare will be provided and whether or not additional assistance is needed from friends or family members.  If your child is staying with a friend or family member, take time to look over their home and ensure that there is nothing there that will be unhealthy or additionally disruptive for your child. Ensuring that your child is well cared for without worry before entering treatment will allow you to better focus on your recovery. If you don’t have a community environment or support groups to help with childcare while you’re in rehab, look for rehab facilities that offer childcare or daycare. This, of course, will not work for children of all ages but may provide enough support for help.  

School Schedule

Limiting disruptions in your child’s education and school schedule will help them adjust during the period you are in treatment. This includes arranging plans for drop-off, pick-up, and routine homework. You may also want to schedule a meeting with the principal, teacher, and guidance counselor to discuss your situation’s specifics.  

Talking With Your Child

Healthcare professionals recommend explaining the situation to children in age-appropriate terms. Often, parents have the inclination to lie or hide the truth about where they’re going and why. This can lead to confusion for your child and later mistrust if they learn the truth from someone else. Talking with your child about why you are going, where you are going, and how long you will be gone is very important. It is difficult to explain a temporary absence, but it is important to take the right approach. Be honest and be prepared to answer questions your child might have. Being open with your children and letting them know they are not to blame or responsible can substantially influence how they adjust during this time. If your child is very young, then you will have to explain it simply by telling them that you are sick and need to go away to get better. If your child is older but still relatively young, you’ll want to keep the language simple and tell them only as much as they need to know. If they are an adolescent or teen, you may be able to have a more open and detailed discussion. Make sure that your child knows that drug addiction is not their fault.   Even after you come home, your recovery process is not finished. You have to show your child that you are doing everything you can to remain sober for yourself and your family. Getting help is one of the most important things you can do as a parent, and going to rehab will give you the tools to recover so that you can be your best. Are you a mother who is looking to help your daughter? Are you looking for an excellent outpatient treatment program designed specifically for women? Join our women-only addiction center Anchored Tides Recovery. Call us today at 1-866-524-6014 and get your loved one on the road to recovery.  

What Happens When You Smoke Too Much Weed?

When it comes to cannabis, do you realize we’re witnessing history unfold? The prohibition of marijuana will be written about in history books, just like the alcohol prohibition from the early 1900s. Over the past 20 years, we’ve witnessed a lot of progress regarding the national status of weed addiction, and those changes continue to happen and come with some questions.  
  • What are the long-term effects of marijuana? 
  • Can you have a fatal overdose of marijuana? 
  • What are the proven health benefits of marijuana, if any?
  • Is it possible to have a “weed addiction?”
  • Is there a cure for marijuana addiction?
  Anchored Tides Recovery has been helping women struggling with addiction for years. In our experience, these are some of the questions that are commonly asked in a treatment setting. While there is no shortage of questions as we navigate through the developing status of marijuana. There is, however, a shortage of long-term scientific research to have conclusive answers. This article will do our best to answer some of the most commonly asked marijuana-related questions using science. We will educate you on the long and short-term effects of marijuana use, and what you read may shock you.  Before we get into the effects of marijuana use and abuse, it helps first to understand how we got here and the current state of the drug…   Smoking-too-much-weed  

Marijuana Prohibition…

For years we have seen a movement to legalize marijuana that has gained a lot of traction and attention. In 1996 marijuana was first legalized for medical use in the state of California; before this, marijuana was highly illegal across the country, with no explanation given as to why. One thing that was clear, whether it was legal or not, people were still using marijuana. As of 2016, millions of U.S. dollars were being spent annually to keep 2.3 million people incarcerated over marijuana-related crimes.  It was legal to drink alcohol when, according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), “Excessive alcohol use is responsible for more than 95,000 deaths a year.” Meanwhile, there is not a single recorded death in history from a marijuana overdose? It just didn’t make sense. The public demanded some leniency and logic from their government and eventually got what they were asking for.  After California made cannabis medically legal in 1996, other states soon followed. As of 2020, 11 states allow legal recreational use of marijuana, and 47 out of 50 states allow medical use of marijuana in some form. However, marijuana is still technically illegal on a federal level. The morality and the legality of marijuana use in the united states come with many different opinions. Regardless of where you stand, the fact is there is still a lack of long-term scientific research to support or refute marijuana use.   

Lack of Scientific Research Regarding Marijuana? Why?

Before 1996, no research was allowed on the effects, medicinal benefits, dangers, or any other aspect of the drug. The government considered marijuana explicitly to be a dangerous controlled substance and not to be tampered with. Once it became legal for medical use in California, grants were issued to begin conducting research.  Smoking-too-much-weed We understand more now than we did 20 years ago, but we are still learning and making scientific advancements. This research has allowed for the creation of CBD (Cannabidiol), an extracted component of marijuana with no psychoactive effects. Scientists are trying to utilize the medical properties of marijuana without the “getting high” part. Like with marijuana, the data related to CBD is still limited and in the early stages.  We face a clear divide on the topic of marijuana in the United States. Marijuana is a drug; as with all drugs, the common factor is long-term damage. Despite its widespread use, the truth is there are many risks to using marijuana.  

Short-term Effects of Weed Addiction:

There are no recorded deaths related to marijuana overdose; it may not be possible to die due to a pure marijuana overdose. That being said, it would be incredibly irresponsible to think marijuana is not dangerous. Even though there is no evidence of a fatal overdose, many deaths are related to marijuana use. People with pre-existing medical conditions are the ones at the highest risk for short-term marijuana-related issues, such as:   Heart attack: Marijuana increases your heart rate for up to 3 hours after use, so older people and people with any existing cardiovascular issues are at high risk for heart attack.    Breathing problems: Marijuana is typically smoked, which is an irritant to the throat and lungs. There are obvious long-term effects of smoking any substance, but in the short term, someone with asthma or other lung issues may stop breathing after inhaling harsh marijuana smoke.   Choking hazard: THC binds to saliva-producing receptors in your glands and can prevent new saliva production. This is referred to as “cottonmouth” among users. Cottonmouth can make it difficult to swallow or breathe; when a person has a hard time swallowing or breathing, this also tends to make them panic, possibly to the point of losing consciousness.    Disorientation: Marijuana is an intoxicant, so it does disorient your senses. This makes you more likely to have some form of accident. You are at higher risk for a car accident or possibly falling while disoriented.      Psychosis: There are many ways to ingest marijuana. A common occurrence is when someone takes an edible form of marijuana and ends up eating too much. This can result in panic attacks or even psychosis. The effects after consuming an edible can last for 6-12 hours. Marijuana has also been found to awaken some resting mental health issues, such as schizophrenia. If you have schizophrenia but never showed any symptoms, marijuana could trigger it.   

Long-term Effects of Smoking too Much Weed:

Although people with pre-existing medical conditions are at higher risk for short-term issues, nobody is safe from the long-term effects of marijuana abuse.  The more you use marijuana, the more tolerance you build up, and you feel less high and more “normal.” Eventually, chronic users find themselves getting high just to perform everyday functions like; sleeping, laughing, or finding motivation.   Smoking-too-much-weed  

Dependence

While marijuana isn’t chemically addictive, it is still possible to have a weed addiction. Habitual use will increase your tolerance for the drug’s effects and cause your mind to become dependent on its use. This leads to a host of other issues, such as:
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Laziness
 

Cancer

For certain types of cancer, A doctor may prescribe marijuana to help ease some of the chemotherapy symptoms and improve life quality. Ironically, smoking marijuana will put you at a significantly higher risk to develop certain cancers, such as:
  • Lung
  • Throat 
  • Mouth
 

Inhaled Illnesses

Aside from lung cancer, the inhalation of marijuana smoke will also contribute to other smoking-related issues, such as: 
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Asthma
  • Chronic cough
  • Halitosis (Sour breath)
 

Is There a Cure for Marijuana Addiction?

There is no simple cure for marijuana addiction, although sobriety is attainable through a combination of counseling and treatment at a recovery center.  Marijuana is not considered to be a “hard drug,” so marijuana addiction is often overlooked, but the long and short-term effects and risks you face by using this drug are apparent. Once use becomes abuse, then you are facing more long-term risks. The prolonged exposure to the effect of the drug can wreak havoc on your mental health, while the long-term effects of common ways to administer the drug bring potentially fatal physical risks.  Anchored Tides Recovery believes some important aspects of overcoming cannabis addiction are environment, counseling, and support. We provide a gender-specific climate for women to overcome addiction and an all-female support group to help with cravings and moments of weakness. If you or someone you know is struggling with marijuana addiction, contact us to take the first steps towards a healthier life. 

Co-Occurring Disorder: Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

co-occuring-disorder-treatment-for-substance-use-disorders
co-occuring-disorder-treatment-for-substance-use-disorders

Co-Occurring Disorders

Individuals who struggle with addiction or substance use disorders and mental health disorders are diagnosed with co-occurring disorders or dual diagnoses. A dual diagnosis is an approach that allows healthcare providers to treat the whole person and not solely their addiction. This has shown to be incredibly beneficial as substance use and mental illness are often closely related. Lets talk about some treatment for co-occuring disorders.  

Substance Use Disorder

Substance use disorder is diagnosed when a person’s use of alcohol or illegal drugs leads to severe mental and physical health issues. This can result in problems at work, school, or home and ruin close relationships with family and friends.  Substance use disorder often occurs with mental health issues such as depression, attention deficit disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and other behavioral illnesses. It is difficult to determine if the substance use caused the mental illness or the other way around in many cases. In either case, substance use cannot be treated without considering cognitive and behavioral health disruptions.  

What does substance use disorder include?

A substance use disorder includes:
  • Alcohol or drug abuse
  • Alcohol or drug dependence
Co-occurring disorders can be difficult to diagnose. Symptoms of illicit drug abuse or addiction and mental illness may mask one another, making it difficult to identify what a person is actually struggling with. Often, individuals with mental health problems do not discuss their drug use with mental health professionals because they do not think it is related to their illness. This can increase the amount of time it takes to get to a correct diagnosis. It is not uncommon for people struggling with their mental health to turn to drug use. Anxious people may take drugs to feel calm, and depressed people may take drugs to numb the pain. In addition to addressing the mental health problem, alcohol or other medications often prevent a person from developing successful coping skills like maintaining satisfying relationships and feeling happy with themselves. It is also important to know how drugs and alcohol impact medicines prescribed for mental illness. Dru and alcohol use, in short, makes mental health conditions worse when not properly disclosed to your healthcare provider. People with co-occurring disorders can stop using alcohol or other substances, but as symptoms of their mental health disorders continue, they may face difficulties. To remedy both conditions, patients need a care team with an awareness of the entire patient history and experience in treatment for co-occuring disorders.    co-occuring-disorder-treatment-for-substance-use-disorders  

Substance Abuse & Addiction

Though it is a fine line, some people may use drugs without becoming addicted. Addiction begins with compulsive behaviors to seek out and use drugs with little regard for the consequences. The increased drug use leads to drug abuse where a person continues to use more of a substance to chase the same high. The increased volume of drug consumption results in long-lasting changes in the brain. Some of these changes are irreversible and permanent.  Exposure to drugs in social settings is often where drug use begins. It may also start with misusing a valid prescription ordered by a doctor. As the person becomes accustomed to the feeling of using drugs, they increase the amount and the frequency in which they operate. This leads to experimenting with and abusing different drugs. The risk of addiction varies according to the substance (controlled or illegal) and how easily you become addicted. Some medicines have a greater risk and induce dependence more quickly than others, such as opioid painkillers. Attempts to stop drug use abruptly may cause intense cravings, make you feel physically ill (withdrawal symptoms), and be dangerous if not properly supervised.  

Treatment for Co-Occurring Disorders

Previously, in the United States, opioid and alcohol abuse treatment was distinct from mental health treatments because there was not a broad understanding of co-occurring conditions. Care was administered using drastically different clinical methods at various facilities. Consequently, many individuals with depression, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, treatment for co-occuring disorders and other severe conditions never received a treatment plan for their substance abuse problems.  Treating only one condition will not cause the other to change immediately, and a siloed treatment approach will not give you lasting results. Both conditions must be treated simultaneously, in the same place, by the same care team to be successful. This is a form of integrated cognitive behavioral therapy, and it is highly effective. About 7 million people who have received treatment for mental health still suffer from opioid or alcohol abuse. The secret to shielding this population from poverty, disease, loneliness, incarceration, and homelessness is integrated care for co-occurring disorders. Are you someone who is looking to help your daughter, mother, sister, or friend? Are you looking for substance abuse treatment options and support groups specifically for women? Join us at the women-only treatment center, Anchored Tides Recovery. Call us today at 1-866-524-6014 and get your loved one on the road to recovery.

Understanding Addiction – Taking Care of Your Mental Health When a Loved One is Battling Addiction

taking-care-of-your-mental-health
taking-care-of-your-mental-health
Addiction is a chronic disease that affects all aspects of a person’s life, including their relationships, career, health, family dynamics, and psychological well-being. When a loved one struggles with the disease of addiction, you may find yourself struggling as well. Anchored Tides Recovery has 20+ years of experience of understanding addiction, an all-female staff, and an all-female client base. Many generations of women find their path to recovery with our treatment options. We have also learned some methods of coping with the challenges of loving someone who is struggling with addiction.    Here is some vital information to keep in mind to avoid losing your mind…  

Help Yourself First

It is natural to be ready and willing to do whatever it takes to help your loved one in their time of need, especially if you are a parent. Believe it or not, this is often detrimental to their process and does more harm than good. Trying to be the hero who saves the day can come at the cost of your relationships, finances, physical health, and sanity. The road to recovery is a long and personal process. When you try to involve yourself too much, it can have an adverse effect. You may end up pushing the person further away or even trigger drug abuse to cope. Accepting that a loved one has an alcohol or drug problem is extremely difficult. Until the person is ready to take the first step, you cannot do much to help them.   

Taking the First Step to Overcome Drug Addiction

For many people trapped in the vicious cycle of drug addiction, the most challenging step toward recovery is the very first one. They have to decide on their own that they want help. This concept is crucial to understand. You can not force a person to get help if they’re not ready to admit they have a problem. It can be very frustrating to be willing to do anything to help someone but have your efforts yield no results because that person isn’t ready to accept your help. For this reason, it’s essential just to make sure you’re focusing on your mental health problems and not enabling them further. People with an addictive behavior may feel uncertain about whether they’re ready to attend treatment facilities. You need to understanding addiction and know that strong emotions such as anger, shame, guilt, depression, and anxiety usually come along with the thought of needing help. Usually, a person needs to hit their own personal version of “rock bottom” before they even admit they need help. Hitting rock bottom is personal. For some users, this part of the journey may take a long time to happen or may not ever happen at all.  

Raising the Bottom

“Raising the Bottom” is a term that describes helping a person hit their version of rock bottom sooner. It requires a lot of discipline and strength, but many counselors agree that understanding addiction may be the best way to help someone who isn’t ready to admit they need help. Your role in raising the bottom is to stop any enabling behaviors and make it so their drug habit becomes inconvenient.    Here are some examples of “Raising the Bottom.”
  • Cutting them off financially.
  • If they’re using drugs in your house, tell them they can’t stay there anymore.
  • Call the authorities if you find them using drugs. 
  To many, this is considered “tough love,” which makes it difficult to do when you care about someone. It helps to change your mentality and keep in mind the long-term goals of raising the bottom. Making it harder for them to live comfortably with their choices does not mean you do not love them. The more difficult it is for them to live this lifestyle, the more likely it will be that they come around to the idea of accepting help.  

Is Addiction A Family Disease?

Here are some reasons why addiction is considered a “family disease”:  
  1.  Addiction’s impact extends to the entire family. When one family member struggles with substance abuse, it can negatively affect everybody else who cares about them. Family and friends may get stuck in a cycle of trying to fix the person and then feel resentful when they see no results or see that their efforts are not appreciated.
  2. Mental health conditions, such as addiction, are hereditary. According to a study by the American Psychological Association (APA), more than half a person’s susceptibility to drugs and alcohol addiction is linked to genetics.
  3. Families play a large role in the drug rehabilitation process. Spouses, parents, children, siblings, and friends need to forgive past mistakes and be empathetic towards the current efforts. Empathy will help you to provide the love and support they need to make progress.
taking-care-of-your-mental-health

Be Patient and Understanding

The road to recovery can be a long and complicated process, both for the person in treatment and for the people around them. They may try and fail multiple times. They will have some good days and some bad days. Don’t assume that a good day means they’re “cured,” and try not to get frustrated if a string of bad days makes it seem like they will never recover. Just remember always to prioritize your own mental health no matter where they are in their recovery process. Don’t enable or do anything to help facilitate their drug use. You can not help someone who is not ready to accept help. You are not responsible for their sobriety, but you are responsible for your well-being.     Have you found your mental health being affected by a loved one who struggles with drug or alcohol addiction? You are not alone; We are here to help you. At Anchored Tides Recovery Center, we always recommend family members to take part in our family programs. Once the client has completed drug addiction treatment, we recommend the family continue working with support programs to better learn about relapse conditions and understanding addiction. Call us today to get started on the road to recovery and addiction-free life. We will educate you on what the process looks like to begin a drug addiction treatment and what is needed to support your loved ones.

Common Triggers for Relapsing on Drugs and Alcohol

common-triggers-for-relapse-on-drugs-and-alcohols
common-triggers-for-relapse-on-drugs-and-alcohols
Relapse is an expected part of the cycle of addiction. It doesn’t matter what type of drug you’re addicted to; some treatment programs just believe you will inevitably fail and face a drug relapse. – “It’s just part of the cycle.”   Is this a crude generalization or a harsh truth? It’s a very controversial idea among treatment facilities and counselors to believe that an addict can ever fully overcome addiction. A significant amount of people struggle with substance abuse, but that doesn’t mean they are all the same. Some of the more popular treatment programs, like AA, subscribe to the belief that addiction is something that can never be cured – you are “in recovery” for life. The idea that people will carry addiction with them forever, and that the process of being “in recovery” never ends, helps many people achieve long-term sobriety; it’s an idea that may be dangerous to challenge.    If you are looking to quit your alcohol and drug addiction but fear that you might relapse and fall into the vicious cycle of addiction again, you are not alone. Statistically, it’s common for people who struggle with drug and alcohol addictions to relapse at some point during recovery. Unfortunately, drug relapse rates for individuals who leave rehab are relatively high. According to the latest data from a study at the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 40 – 60% of people treated for substance use disorders will relapse at some point.   

Why do I Relapse After Staying Sober?

A trigger can be anything that may cause you to drink or use drugs following a period of sobriety; relationships, emotions, thoughts, habits, physical illness, stress, and lack of sleep, among many other things.  While some common triggers of relapse are obvious — like being around other people who are using drugs and alcohol — others are less straightforward, and you may not be aware of the signs of relapsing at times. It is essential to understand what might trigger you to relapse and learn healthy coping mechanisms when triggered.  

What Are The Most Common Relapse Triggers?

Here is a list of 10 common triggers that contribute to drug relapse:  

Stress

Stress causes significant adverse effects on the mind and body. When a person becomes stressed out, their mind goes into a state of “wanting” for the drug or alcohol during stressful situations—Especially if the substance was the person’s primary coping mechanism.   

Exposure to Alcohol or Drugs

There is a nostalgic aspect of drug use that can be particularly triggering. Being in an environment where there is drug use might be setting yourself up to fail. The sight, smell, or even sound of a drug being used could cause you to get flashbacks of your old habits. Try to remove yourself from any environments that will cause temptation.   

Emotions (High and Low)

Perceived negative emotions like sadness, depression, guilt, loneliness, and anger can lead to emotional relapse. People often use drugs or alcohol to gain temporary relief from these feelings, which can easily lead a person back to addictive behaviors. Experiencing these emotions is normal and an essential aspect of recovery (and life) – but they are uncomfortable. Learning how to manage your feelings is an integral part of recovery (and life, again) and can help to avoid the risk of relapse.  

People or Places Associated with Addiction

Seeing an old friend you used to do drugs with can cause you to develop an urge or craving to use again. Likewise, certain places that remind you of your addiction can be triggering. Some people do get dragged down by the company they decide to keep. It’s hard to do, but sometimes it’s best to find new friends and surround yourself with people who will be a good influence.   

Special Events of Celebration

Festive life events such as holidays, birthdays, and graduations are often overlooked as relapse triggers. On the other hand, the anniversary of a loved one’s death or a funeral may stir up thoughts and emotions that can lead to substance use and trigger thoughts of getting back to your drug of choice. Be careful not to let the celebrations turn into regrets.  

Mental or Physical Illness

Coexisting mental disorders are common with substance use disorder, and they make the struggle of addiction more difficult. Depression, anxiety, and any other underlying mental illnesses can feel overwhelming and may make you consider self-medicating for temporary relief. Physical conditions and pain can also put you at risk for relapsing, as your body is stressed and may want to numb the pain by taking drugs. This pain also relates to drug withdrawal and the extreme discomfort that comes with it. For instance, an alcoholic for an alcoholic who stops drinking, the effects of alcohol create physical dependence, and their body literally depends on alcohol for it to function correctly. Withdrawing from alcohol can be intensely uncomfortable, even fatal, and a person may be tempted just to drink, so they don’t have to deal with it or to cope with the pain.  

Poor Self-Care

Self-care is an integral part of the addiction recovery process. Poor self-care sends messages to your brain that you don’t care about your wellbeing and can trigger a relapse. You need to engage in self-care like showering, exercise, meditating, and having a proper sleep regimen to support your mental wellness in recovery and improve life quality.  

Relationships and Intimacy

In the early stages of recovery, it’s recommended not to get involved in a relationship until you are stable; this could take a year or so. Relationships are hard work and come with stress, taking  away focus from creating your sobriety. A break up with your new partner could lead you back to emotional stress that can put you at risk for relapse.  

Boredom and Social Isolation

Boredom and social isolation are significant reasons for relapse in early recovery. When you are bored or isolated, you are left with your thoughts and emotions, which you often do not want to hear. The more you become socially isolated, the easier it is to make sense of drug or alcohol use to yourself. Negative feelings are a part of everyday life; it’s essential not to let them get hold of you.   

Overconfidence

Sometimes people who are new to sobriety have a newfound pride that they will never use alcohol or drugs ever again, no matter what. Having self-confidence is great, but becoming overconfident can put you in risky situations. All it takes is one bad decision, and that confidence will turn into shame.    

You are Not Alone; We are Here to Help!

Relapse doesn’t make you a failure. We fall, and we pick ourselves back up. Learning to recognize triggers, getting help from professionals, seeking treatment, and building a support network are valuable tools in preventing relapse. Make a relapse prevention plan and stick to it! For more information on addiction treatment, therapy, and mental health, please contact us. Mindfulness-based relapse prevention is essential for people in recovery. Anchored Tides Recovery center offers various treatment options to deal with stages of relapse.   

A Guide to Success: Planning an Intervention

common-mistakes-that-families-make
common-mistakes-that-families-make
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “over 23 million adults in the United States struggle with drug addiction at some point in their lives” That’s more than 10% of American adults! Of the people who struggle with addiction, 75% report never receiving any drug addiction treatment. It’s hard to admit when you need help. While you’re using drugs, you may not even realize the pain and damage you’re causing to your family and friends. For a person struggling with drug addiction, life in recovery often beings with planning an Intervention.    Anchored Tides Recovery has 20+ years of combined experience helping women take steps towards a life in recovery. In our experience, we know that many times the road begins with a formal intervention. This blog will go over some tips and common mistakes made when it comes to interventions for substance abuse. An intervention is a helpful and sometimes necessary step in the healing process, but there can be negative consequences if you do not approach the situation properly.   If you’re wondering how to stage an intervention, an excellent place to start is by understanding the process of a successful intervention, and clearly defining the primary goal.  

What is an Intervention?

A typical intervention for an addict is an orchestrated attempt by a support group – usually close friends or family members – to convince someone to seek professional help for drug or alcohol dependence. Loved ones have a chance to share their emotions and address personal experiences regarding how the addicted person’s drug use has affected them. Once their side of the story is shared, they have the opportunity to show encouragement and support for their loved one to seek help. common-mistakes-that-families-make The adverse consequences of substance abuse are well-known, yet a person trapped in the vicious cycle of addiction does not realize it until it’s too late. Drug dependence affects the quality of your life, induces mental health issues, causes withdrawal symptoms, and even suicidal behavior. Under the influence of drugs, a person loses the will to reconstruct their lives. At this stage, you may need to step in for crisis intervention and save your loved ones from a handicapped life of substance abuse.   There has been an increase of interventions occurring in recent years due to shows like Dr. Phil or Intervention on A&E. The reason these segments are so popular on television is that an intervention is usually a dramatic and emotional experience. Despite Hollywood’s attention, walking in on an intervention for substance use disorder might be a drug user’s worst nightmare. Interventions are often met with resistance and hostility, bringing us to #1 on our list to approach interventions properly and have a clear plan of action.  

Get Help From a Professional Interventionist

Trying to hold an intervention without first seeking professional help is a common mistake. There are many rehabilitation programs offered at various treatment centers that employ intervention specialists to aid you in the process. They act as a host to the event and make sure that everything is done correctly. When appropriately handled, an intervention should remain constructive towards the ultimate goal of supporting the addict’s health and recovery from substance abuse. There is a cost involved in hiring professional treatment providers. Still, this cost is worth it because this step is often the difference between your loved one storming out or your loved one accepting help.  Substance abuse behavior brings various health issues, and sometimes people involved in the intervention have held on to a lot of frustration and anger. A moderator with no emotional attachment can make sure that these emotions get appropriately expressed. If they aren’t, then you may trigger an altercation, resistance, or even violence. A professional moderator has enough experience to control the situation before it escalates into something destructive. The sensitive nature of the emotions involved in the treatment process leads us to our next tip for success on the road to recovery.  

Choose The Intervention Team Carefully

An intervention is a group effort. If you are organizing an intervention for an addict, you will have to determine the form of treatment and the right people to invite to join. You want to avoid involving too many people because you run the risk of intimidating or overwhelming the person. A small intervention team of 4 to 8 people who are closest to the person and have been affected the most is best.  The ideal attendee is someone whose opinions matter the most to the addict, someone they love and respect, who has also personally been affected by their addictive behaviors.  You may know an attendee who seems ideal in some cases, but they are harboring resentment in a negative or unhealthy way. If you think this person will have too difficult a time expressing their emotions constructively and calmly, it may be best not to include them. Tell them there will be an intervention but let them know you think it would be best for them not to be involved in the process just yet. Once you have the right group of people for participation in treatment for substance abuse, you’re ready for the next step.  

Rehearse

There may only be one opportunity to do the intervention the right way. Since it is fragile and volatile by nature, your best chance for success comes from being fully prepared. People under the effects of drugs are often reluctant to the idea of a treatment program because they don’t want to appear vulnerable and weak.  common-mistakes-that-families-make Here are a few aspects of going over in your rehearsal:
  • Understand their patterns of behavior
  • The structure and type of intervention
  • Decide who will speak and when
  • Take turns practicing what you will say.
  • Discuss a plan of how you will get your addicted loved one to the intervention
  • Pick a day and time for the actual intervention. 
  • What is the goal after the intervention?
  Once you’ve rehearsed how the intervention should ideally go, there is one last important piece of the puzzle before you move forward.  

Have a Plan of Action

Change is necessary to keep the intervention on track. You can’t simply go back to life as usual in the end. Experience shows that the more time that passes after an intervention, the less effective the intervention will be—so having a plan and being ready to take steps toward life in recovery immediately after the intervention is the last critical step. Planning out what comes immediately after the intervention is another aspect in which hiring intervention specialists may show added value. A professional interventionist may utilize connections in the industry to help move forward as quickly and efficiently as possible to treat substance abuse and underlying mental health disorders. Having a bag packed with the essential items and a bed at a residential inpatient facility, or medically assisted detox program are extremely helpful ways to follow up with the intervention.    Enough is Enough Getting through to a loved one who is battling drug and alcohol addiction can be frustrating. If you feel like you’ve tried everything, but nothing is working, an intervention may guide your loved one to accept help. Intervention for substance abuse is a very emotional and delicate process. It may be difficult initially, but it could be the best thing for them in the long term. Drug and alcohol abuse have devoured the lives of so many brilliant people. Anchored Tides Recovery believes that the right environment for substance abuse treatment is one crucial factor of the recovery process. We believe in the concept of “Treatment for women, by women.” so we’ve created a gender-specific environment for women to be able to thrive. If your loved one decides after their intervention that they think they’d be comfortable taking the path to recovery in a female-only environment. We provide formal treatment and encourage positive action in a community setting to feel alienated.    Contact Us, and one of our medical professionals will talk to you about various treatment plans and intervention options. Our rehabilitation center provides a range of treatment options that treat substance abuse and ensure your abstinence from alcohol and drugs. Healing starts here.